Archive for Fundraising

Diabetes Awareness ’09

It’s that time of year again boys and girls, ladies and gentlemen. Next week is National Diabetes Week, and, starting Sunday, July 17, there’s tonnes of awareness to be done.

Diabetes Australia has a brief note about the upcoming event, and really doesn’t go any further into it. All that is definitely on for next week is the 2009 Walk to Cure Diabetes, run by JDRF.

Needless to say, the most important part of any awareness week is you. Get out there, talk to people about Diabetes, donate to JDRF or Diabetes Australia. And pray that, one day, a cure will be found.

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May-day, May-day

Devoted reader,

I apologise profusely for my slackness in keeping the world updated with the progress of life with dearest Kate and Lance-a-lot, but I am troubled.

I’ve had significant issues in getting in contact, with only one short phonecall to Lance last month, and quickly catching Kate before she shot out the door yesterday. All I can tell you is that they are alive. Admittedly, though, Lance sounded in good spirits when I spoke with him ūüôā

Meanwhile, there’s not a great deal I can tell you at this point from a diabetes perspective, but, there is another event close to my heart coming up soon:

Next week, May 11-17, is ME/CFS Awareness Week, and Dan and I plan to go along to the event organised in NSW, the Creative For A Second art tour.

As always, donations to both the ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Society and JDRF are greatly appreciated by all people involved.

I hope to be able to update you with more soon!

Janek

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Incredibly Generous Poison!

Lance and I both developed a¬† soft spot for a¬†totally-kid friendly American game show, ¬†“Don’t Forget The Lyrics.”

I have a thing for the host…he’s an African American¬†thirty-something hunk named Wayne Brady,¬†who can sing, and is so passionate and eager for the guest to climb the money ladder-Lance is intrigued by the rather eccentric guests that attempt to win a million dollars by replacing the words or phrases of obscure or well-known songs.

 

I have  a photographic memory when it comes to song lyrics, and Lance has caught on to the fact that if I auditioned for the US show, that I may have a chance of winning the jackpot.

Tonight, we sat gobsmacked, as the host Wayne Brady announced who the Celebrity Guest would be.

Bret Michaels, lead singer of metal band, Poison, announced how he was a fan of the show, and that any money he won would not be going in his own pocket, but a place very close to his and all of our hearts.

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. (JDRF.)

Bret Michaels has had Type 1 Diabetes for 22 years, diagnosed at 7 years of age.

Lance’s mouth was still wide open as he heard the singer speak about his life on injections. It was probably the first time he had heard a famous male speak so honestly about living with their shared condition.

Bret Michaels won $200 000 for …..52441

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. (JDRF.)

Congratulations, Bret, for sharing your life story with young children, and more importantly, raising US$200 000!!

I have to admit that I am hardly a Poison fan…lol…but I will¬†never forget the night that¬†I watched some hope¬† for a cure with my son¬†, delivered in the shape of the Bret Michaels. ūüôā

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

 

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World Diabetes Day, 2008

More guest posting by Janek!

Once again, World Diabetes Day has come (and gone, sorry for late posting), and it’s been celebrated around the world in many different ways. The theme this year was Diabetes in Children and Adolescents, making it particularly pertinent to this blog. As my darling nephew struggles with his own condition, it’s something that I always think about; or, as Helen Lovejoy cries out in The Simpsons, “Won’t somebody PLEASE think of the children?”. This year, Diabetes Australia worked with the JDRF and hosted a gala dinner (or, as my mother calls them, a galah), as well as hosting a group of sufferers as they climb Mt Kosciouszko.

Girls form a big heart and boys form a big foot to promote good cardiovascular and footcare in diabetics in India

Girls form a big heart and boys form a big foot to promote good cardiovascular and footcare in diabetics in India

I found that part of this year’s campaign was “bringing diabetes to light”, and a number of monuments around the world were lit up in blue. I’ve love to post them all here, but Kate might get annoyed with me, so I’ll direct you to the WDD Slideshow and the Flickr page for the photos, and end this post with my two favourite photos…

San Francisco City Hall

San Francisco City Hall

Nagoya Castle, Japan

Nagoya Castle, Japan

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Exciting News

Guest Post by Janek!

Progress is always slow coming. We have been waiting for so long to find a cure for Diabetes, in any form.

Today, another step has been taken: Student’s Insulin Discovery

No, it isn’t a cure, but as science begins to understand how insulin works. And with discoveries like this, science can continue to work on both treatment and towards a cure. Now, more than ever, is a time to consider your donations to JDRF; and Diabetes Australia. If we can fund more research, we can find that cure!

Also, don’t forget November 14 is World Diabetes Day. That’s two days before my birthday. Impressive, no?

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Wheels Of Fortune.

It’s only just over three months away until the 6th annual¬† JDRF “Ride For A Cure” takes place.

The Hugely Successful "RIDE TO CURE DIABETES."

The Hugely Successful Ride For A Cure.

My good friend and fellow JDRF advocate/parent, Cathy Forbes and her amazing quadruplet of cyclists are hitting the roads for their third trek through the picturesque Barossa Valley In South Australia.

Cathy, her family and friends have one very special reason why the “Ride” is so incredibly important.

Cathy’s gorgeous daughter, Carrie has the double whammy-Type 1 Diabetes and Coeliac Disease.

The Forbes Family have made an incredible contribution over the years through fundraising, in fact this is their third year that they have rode their way that mile further to finding a cure.

Michael On The Road

Michael On The Road

In January, 2009, Carrie Forbes will have two very important family members, joined by two newbies to the team, who will be riding in her honour. Like any JDRF fundraising event, all donations are put directly into laboratories, research projects and trials, in a desperate attempt to find a cure for type 1 diabetes.

Proud Cathy With Her "Boys."

Proud Cathy With Her "Boys"

On behalf of a¬†JDRF Family who have tirelessly worked and participated in so many fundraising events, I am asking¬†www.whydidtheinsulindie.com readers to¬†think of¬†every child, (or remember when you were one) with this insidious¬†condition.¬†The loose change in your pocket will help to increase Cathy’s fundraising total.

                                                                   

To contribute in any small way¬†to JDRF’s Ride For A Cure 2009, and support my friends, Cathy and Garry, and Lance’s friend (and major crush) Carrie, please click on the below link.

http://ride.jdrf.org.au/CatherineForbes/

  Thanks so much, everyone!

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Suffer The Little Children…

I’m a little annoyed.

Maybe it’s all the shenanigans regarding governments and elections of recent times…It’s just made me recall all of the¬†promises and deals that were made¬†relating to an Insulin Pump¬†Scheme that would be applicable for children with IDDM¬†up to 18 years¬†of age before the 2007 election.¬†¬†

I was first contacted¬†by JDRF Head Office¬†last year, before our Federal Election. A small group of parents and I¬†were asked to contact Mr Howard. Others were pleading with our Members of Parliament to take into consideration how many children with diabetes don’t have insulin pumps, and how¬†desperately they¬†needed them.

On International Diabetes Day,2007, Mr Howard historically announced that, if re-elected, he would provide $22 million to JDRF, to ensure that many children, and especially the ones who truly needed a pump, got one.

Despite our inital frenzy, at this stage, Mr Howard was lagging in the polls, so Kevin Rudd and team were our next target.

We rang Labor party hotlines, we wrote to Kevin personally, we even joined his Facebook Page. JDRF Youth Ambassadors followed him around and spoke of their need for an insulin pump program to combat their ailing health.

He knew that this was something that advocates and JDRF expected him to at least match, or maybe supercede the amount promised by Mister Howard.

So, Kevin Rudd became our new Prime Minister, and we said goodbye to our 22 million dollar promise.

Nothing was mentioned about Health, nor Childhood Diabetes in his victory speeches. I was silently worried.

He made grandiose promises to amend the public hospital debacles, and even¬†establish doctor’s surgeries¬†replaced by¬†state-of-the-art medical centres, where you could see your doctor, as well as have¬†all of your blood work, x rays, physio and dentistry taken care of in the¬†same complex.

Australia nodded and agreed wholeheartedly. This was a man who cared for the little Aussie battlers.

However, in that election promise, there was no mention of a insulin pump grant.

In the meantime, Lance’s health took a turn for the worse. His endocrinologist spoke to me about the possiblity of getting an insulin pump.¬† When I bought up the¬†possibility¬†of¬†obtaining one through the¬†Insulin Pump Grant, he raised his eyebrows, stopped writing frantically, and shook his head. Hot, angry tears spilt down my face.

I began looking around and finally settled on a Medtronic pump.

The rep, Louise, and I gained a fantastic rapport. 

.¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†totally¬† I really loved the way she communicated with me and understood how desperately a pump would be beneficial for Lance. I mentioned the insulin pump grant to her. She grimaced, and said something along the lines of, “If it does happen, it won’t be for years, and it wouldn’t be anywhere near the amount promised by Howard.” I sighed, disheartened, and continued listening.

 I put DAYS into writing letters to different influential people-some responded, but it all depended on the upcoming election. As soon as we knew that the Labor party were victorious, I began furiously writing to various Health Ministers, Members of Parliament, and King Pin himself, without one reply.

Suffer the little children..."

Suffer the little children...

Just before our annual budget was released in May, our very good friend, Gareth Eldershaw, (Gareth completed an interview for www.whydidtheinsulindie.com earlier this year), wrote to Arch Bevis,Federal Member for the Seat of Brisbane.

This is what Arch wrote in his comments regarding the budget results.

Firstly, he made reference to the letter that Gareth had written to him, complete with Jelly Baby Lapel Pin. (Budget night happens to coincide with Jelly Baby Month, so we make it a point that each MP is sent a pin and request that they wear it on their lapel on the night that has the Nation at a standstill.)

“May is a special month for JDRF as we try to make the community more aware of Type 1. As you know the jelly baby is a sort of motto that represents a vital aid to help us recover from a ‚Äúhypo‚ÄĚ when our glucose levels are too low. There‚Äôs a little blue guy in the envelope that I‚Äôd like to give you and ask you to wear in May and especially on Budget night.”

I can tell Gareth that I am wearing his little blue guy on my lapel, as I did last night during the budget. Gareth went on..

” We talked about the grant to fund the reimbursement of insulin pumps for kids under the age of 18. 3000 pumps for all these kids (over a 5-year period) would cost $35m. It‚Äôs a lot of money I know, but you know how much it will save the government in the future? Of course it will make life a bit more bearable (and safe too) if kids can use insulin pumps.”

I was very pleased to have been able to ring Gareth up today and say that in last night‚Äôs budget we made a step in that direction. I do not pretend that we have gone as far as we need to. I want to see the opportunity to benefit from an insulin pump‚ÄĒand not everybody with diabetes is suited to an insulin pump‚ÄĒbe made available to all. But I do applaud the Minister for Health and Ageing, Nicola Roxon, for her efforts in recent times in ensuring that the budget includes a provision that will see about 700 young Australians gain access to an insulin pump. I look forward to continuing to work inside government now rather than from the opposition benches to try to have that program extended.

The grand result?? JDRF were given $5.5 million, to be dispensed over three years, to provide insulin pumps for 700 children.

After much planning and deliberating, JDRF will begin accepting applications for contributions towards the purchase of an insulin pump. It will be based on a financial means test, and the most that can be received per child is $2500. Families without health insurance can begin applying for insulin pumps for their children in November.

So, with the average insulin pump costing $6000, (notice, I say average ), and with approximately 1.7 million dollars provided each year, it won’t take long before all of the money is dispensed. If you are a suitable candidate for the $2500, what happens then? How do you get the rest of the money? Fundraising is about the only real option,and we all know how difficult that is.

I’m really not trying to look a gift horse in the mouth.

I’m so grateful that we were acknowledged at all, the heart and soul of some 50 parents went into sharing their children’s private stories regarding life without an insulin pump. I’m sure PLENTY of other charities tried their hardest to get a financial boost without succeeding, so I really don’t want to appear like I’m complaining or ungrateful.

I guess it just smarts a little that we could have had 22 million dollars.

It hurts to think that some families will qualify for the $2500, but will be totally stuck when it comes to raising the rest. Not to mention those who receive $750-I mean, what happens there?

  • Knowing JDRF Australia, they¬†may have some amazing fund raising venture up their sleeve, but in all truthfulness, does it leave families any better off than before this money was offered? Personally, if I hadn’t have paid for Lance’s pump outright, and I knew that there was NO way I could afford to pay for the outstanding amount, I think (and only if Lance’s health was in excellent shape), that I would forfeit the opportunity. JDRF staff are going to have to make some really difficult decisions without being biased to families they know well and adore.

 Vote for whomever will give you a better Health Care System, America!

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